"Death!"
"Let the corpse of mind lie unburied on the edge of the Great Sea!"

ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΛΗ Lambskin in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"Let the corpse of mind lie unburied on the edge of the Great Sea!" [via]

"Slay mind."
Somnium: A Fantastic Romance

Lunar Rover: An Interview With Steve Moore And Extract From Somnium" by Aug Stone is an interview with Steve Moore about his first novel Somnium: A Fantastic Romance [also] that includes mentions of Alan Moore and a cameo by Austin Osman Spare. The interview concludes with an excerpt from the book.

"Alan Moore says it’s ‘a masterpiece’. Indeed. Steve Moore’s Somnium is a tour-de-force of playful majesty and magic, of style and of love. Spanning centuries, even aeons in its dreamworld, it ranges from Gothic novel through Elizabethan tragedy and mediaeval romance to piquant Decadence, all via the Greek myth of lunar goddess Selene and her mortal lover Endymion. It is nothing short of an epic love song to The Moon and of, as per her reflective nature, ‘the love the Moon has always had for Earthly things below’.

Those familiar with Alan Moore’s Unearthing, will know of his friend, mentor, and collaborator Steve Moore’s long obsession with the Moon-Goddess. In October 1976, having improvised a magic ritual with a Chinese coin sword, he awoke near dawn to hear an unexpected whisper which would provide a clue to his life’s work. Though, as Steve notes below, perhaps the lunar associations were always there. Unearthing takes us through Steve’s life — writing comics, studying and producing scholarly work on the I Ching, editing and contributing to Fortean Studies and Fortean Times — and also shows us the beginnings of Somnium, his debut novel.” [via]

"There was also something of the magical in how I came to read the book. Having learned of Strange Attractor Press and its biography of Austin Osman Spare, Somnium also caught my eye as I was perusing their website. But I thought nothing more of it until a few weeks later I had just finished Israel Regardie’s essay ‘The Art And Meaning Of Magic’ and the following day, quite out of the blue, I was asked to interview Steve Moore regarding his new book. Regardie’s essay, when describing the Sephiroth of The Tree of Life, primarily deals with Yesod, the sphere of the moon. So fresh in my mind were the traditional attributes of that heavenly body — its colours purple and silver, its jewels pearl and moonstone, its number being nine, and so much more; traits Moore makes wonderful use of throughout the book. Though one need not be familiar with these to appreciate its splendour.” [via]

Physical copies of the work are available via the Strange Attractor website:

"Written in the early years of the 21st century, when the author was engaged in dream-explorations and mystical practices centred on the Greek moon-goddess Selene, Somnium is an intensely personal and highly-embroidered fictional tapestry that weaves together numerous historical and stylistic variations on the enduring myth of Selene and Endymion. Ranging through the 16th to 21st centuries, it combines mediæval, Elizabethan, Gothic and Decadent elements in a fantastic romance of rare imagination.

With its delirious and heartbroken text spiralling out from the classical myth of Endymion and the Greek lunar goddess Selene, Somnium is an extraordinary odyssey through love and loss and lunacy, illuminated by the silvery moonlight of its exquisite language.

With an afterword by Alan Moore, whose biographical piece Unearthing details the life of his friend and mentor Steve Moore, and includes the circumstances surrounding the writing of Somnium.” [via]

"Mind is the traitor."
"This is the mystery."
"Life!"
Griffith Park Rose Vine Altar

"In ancient Egypt roses were used to worship the goddess Isis, the ideal mother and wife. They were considered sacred flowers and have been found in Egyptian tombs.

The Griffith Park Rose Vine Altar was constructed as an offering to Isis on the occasion of the New Moon in Sagittarius on November 25, 2011.”

Griffith Park Rose Vine Altar

 

The Hermetic Library visual pool is a visual scavenger hunt for images of a living Western Esoteric Tradition.

Images of your ritual or ritual space, images of sigils or tools, showing off your own library or special volume from the restricted stacks, sacred spaces and places, esoteric artefacts and installations, inspired paintings and people – these and much more are part of the culture and practice of magick.

"Swear to hele all."
"Tyle!"
"Cowan, skidoo!"
How Sweet I Roamed

How Sweet I Roamed" by The Fugs from Electromagnetic Steamboat: The Reprise Recordings

"How sweet I roam’d from field to field,
And tasted all the summer’s pride,
‘Till I the prince of love beheld,
Who in the sunny beams did glide!

He shew’d me lilies for my hair,
And blushing roses for my brow;
He led me through his gardens fair,
Where all his golden pleasures grow.

With sweet May dews my wings were wet,
And Phoebus fir’d my vocal rage;
He caught me in his silken net,
And shut me in his golden cage.

He loves to sit and hear me sing,
Then, laughing, sports and plays with me;
Then stretches out my golden wing,
And mocks my loss of liberty.” — William Blake

"In this chapter, the idea is given that all limitation and evil is an exceedingly rare accident; there can be no night in the whole of the Solar System, except in rare spots, where the shadow of a planet is cast by itself. It is a serious misfortune that we happen to live in a tiny corner of the system, where the darkness reaches such a high figure as 50 per cent. The same is true of moral and spiritual conditions."

Commentary (ΛΖ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΛΖ Dragons in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"In this chapter, the idea is given that all limitation and evil is an exceedingly rare accident; there can be no night in the whole of the Solar System, except in rare spots, where the shadow of a planet is cast by itself. It is a serious misfortune that we happen to live in a tiny corner of the system, where the darkness reaches such a high figure as 50 per cent.

The same is true of moral and spiritual conditions.” [via]

"There may be some significance in the chapter number, which is that of Jechidah the highest unity of the soul."

Commentary (ΛΖ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΛΖ Dragons in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"There may be some significance in the chapter number, which is that of Jechidah the highest unity of the soul." [via]

"Dragons are in the East supposed to cause eclipses by devouring the luminaries."

Commentary (ΛΖ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΛΖ Dragons in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"Dragons are in the East supposed to cause eclipses by devouring the luminaries." [via]