O vanity of vain words! O cozening, deceitful art! Nimbly do the great ones of to-day wrestle with the evil-smelling breath of their mouths, twisting and contorting it into beguilements, bastardising and corrupting the essence of things, sucking as a greedy vampire the blood from your hearts, and breathing into your nostrils the rigid symbols of law and of order, begotten on the death-bed of their understanding.
In Her wine-cup are seven streams of the blood of the Seven Spirits of God.
In Nomine Babalon, LI

LI

I feel so much love that it causes me pain.

The orgasmic rapture as my heart is slain,

Your holy altar, I pour my blood on

I raise up the cup and adore Babalon!

In Nomine Babalon: 156 Adorations to the Scarlet Goddess

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to submit your work for consideration as part of the Arts and Letters pool, contact the librarian.

In Nomine Babalon, XXXVIII

XXXVIII

Myst’ry of myst’ry Thou goddess divine!

Anoint me with blood as I kneel at Your shrine!

Bless me with the weapon of Avalon,

I raise up the cup and adore Babalon!

In Nomine Babalon: 156 Adorations to the Scarlet Goddess

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to submit your work for consideration as part of the Arts and Letters pool, contact the librarian.

Mr. Aleister Crowley, the author, declines to make himself invisible in court

On Friday, April 13th, 1934, the Manchester Guardian published “Mr. Aleister Crowley, the author, declines to make himself invisible in court" and today The Guardian has brought the article back from the archives.


Aleister Crowley, c 1938. Photograph: Hulton Getty

"The ‘black magic’ libel action again came before Mr. Justice Swift and a special jury in the King’s Bench Division yesterday.

Mr. Aleister Crowley, the author, claimed damages against Miss Nina Hamnett, authoress of a book entitled ‘Laughing Torso,’ and Messrs. Constable and Co., Limited, the publishers, and Messrs. Charles Whittingham and Briggs, the printers.

Mr. Crowley complained that the book imputed that he practised ‘black magic’ and he said this was a libel upon him. The defence was a plea of justification.

At the material time Mr. Crowley had a villa on the mountain-side at Cefalu, Sicily, which was known as the ‘Abbey of Thelema.’ He denied that he practised ‘black magic’ there. He also denied that a baby mysteriously disappeared, as the defence alleged, from the ‘Abbey.’

Mr. Martin O’Connor (for Miss Hamnett) resuming his cross-examination yesterday, invited Mr. Crowley to try his magic in court. ‘You said yesterday,’ said Mr O’Connor, ‘that, as the result of early experiments, you invoked certain forces with the result that some people were attacked by unseen assailants. Try your magic now on my learned friend (pointing to Mr. Malcolm Hilbery, K.C.). I am sure he will not object.’ ‘I would not attack anyone,’ replied Mr. Crowley. ‘I have never done wilful harm to any human being.’

When invited again Mr. Crowley replied: ‘I absolutely refuse.’

'On a later occasion,' continued Mr. O'Connor, 'you said you succeeded in rendering yourself invisible. Would you like to try that on now for, if you don't, I shall pronounce you an imposter? - You can ask me to do anything you like. It won't alter the truth.'

Counsel then dealt with the ritual observed in the ceremonies at the villa at Cefalu. Mr. Crowley denied that a cat was killed in the ceremony and that part of the cat’s blood was drunk by a person taking part. ‘There was no cat, no animal, no blood, and no drinking,’ he declared.

In re-examination Mr. Crowley agreed that he had studied black magic, though only as a student. He had never practised black magic, and had always written about it in terms of strongest condemnation.

When Mr. Crowley’s evidence was concluded Mr. Justice Swift asked him to tell the Court ‘the shortest, and at the same time comprehensive, definition of magic which he knew.’

Mr. Crowley: Magic is the science of the art of causing change to occur in conformity with the will. White magic is if the will is righteous and black magic is if the will is perverse.

Mr. Justice Swift: Does that involve the invocation of spirits? - It may do so. It does involve the invocation of the holy guardian angel who is appointed by Almighty God to watch over each of us.

Is it in your view, the art of controlling spirits so as to affect the course of events? - That is part of magic. One small branch.

If the object of the control is good then it is white magic? - Yes.

When the object of the control is bad what spirits do you invoke? - You cannot invoke evil spirits. You must evoke them and call them out.

When the object is bad you evoke evil spirits? - Yes. You put yourself in their power. In that case it is possible to control evil spirits or blind spirits for a good purpose as we might if we use the dangerous elements of fire and electricity for heating and lighting, &c.”

"Having purchased my tie and wept together about Bond street, we began to talk about the war. I said to him: ‘If I had come into this shop (or should I say store) with the firm conviction that you were a dangerous maniac, thirsting for my blood, that you were insensible to every feeling of humanity, that the fiercest and most malignant wild beasts had nothing on you (I believe that is the correct phrase) in the matter of atrocity, I do not think we should have settled this matter of the tie (or should I say neckwear) with the philosophic calm which has characterized our interview up to this point.’ I regret to say that this person was so lost to all sense of patriotism as to agree with me."

Pax Hominibus Bonae Voluntatis by Aleister Crowley in International, Dec 1917.

"Having purchased my tie and wept together about Bond street, we began to talk about the war. I said to him: ‘If I had come into this shop (or should I say store) with the firm conviction that you were a dangerous maniac, thirsting for my blood, that you were insensible to every feeling of humanity, that the fiercest and most malignant wild beasts had nothing on you (I believe that is the correct phrase) in the matter of atrocity, I do not think we should have settled this matter of the tie (or should I say neckwear) with the philosophic calm which has characterized our interview up to this point.’ I regret to say that this person was so lost to all sense of patriotism as to agree with me." [via]

"And so, alas, it all came about. These two master minds could not foresee that everyone who had read Hugo’s great story would leave the theatre foaming at the mouth, raving for blood. Similarly with ‘Hedda Gabler.’ They had to improve on Ibsen’s great curtain, and bring in George Tesman to confront Brack, who faints on hearing the pistol shot, and asks, ‘Why should you faint at my wife’s death?’ with all the air of one who proposes an amusing riddle!"

What’s Wrong with the Movies? by Aleister Crowley in Vanity Fair, Jul 1917.

"And so, alas, it all came about.

These two master minds could not foresee that everyone who had read Hugo’s great story would leave the theatre foaming at the mouth, raving for blood.

Similarly with ‘Hedda Gabler.’ They had to improve on Ibsen’s great curtain, and bring in George Tesman to confront Brack, who faints on hearing the pistol shot, and asks, ‘Why should you faint at my wife’s death?’ with all the air of one who proposes an amusing riddle!” [via]

"The word ‘Phoenix’ may be taken as including the idea of ‘Pelican’, the bird, which is fabled to feeds its young from the blood of its own breast. Yet the two ideas, though cognate, are not identical, and ‘Phoenix’ is the more accurate symbol."

Commentary (ΜΔ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΔ The Mass of the Phœnix in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"The word ‘Phoenix’ may be taken as including the idea of ‘Pelican’, the bird, which is fabled to feeds its young from the blood of its own breast. Yet the two ideas, though cognate, are not identical, and ‘Phoenix’ is the more accurate symbol." [via]

"This is the special number of Horus; it is the Hebrew blood, and the multiplication of the 4 by the 11, the number of Magick, explains 4 in its finest sense. But see in particular the accounts in Equinox I, vii of the circumstances of the Equinox of the Gods."

Commentary (ΜΔ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΔ The Mass of the Phœnix in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"This is the special number of Horus; it is the Hebrew blood, and the multiplication of the 4 by the 11, the number of Magick, explains 4 in its finest sense. But see in particular the accounts in Equinox I, vii of the circumstances of the Equinox of the Gods." [via, see, see]

"He puts the second Cake to the wound. I stanch the blood; the wafer soaks It up, and the high priest invokes!"

ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΔ The Mass of the Phœnix in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

He puts the second Cake to the wound.
I stanch the blood; the wafer soaks
It up, and the high priest invokes!” [via]

"Now I begin to pray: Thou Child, holy Thy name and undefiled! Thy reign is come: Thy will is done. Here is the Bread; here is the Blood. Bring me through midnight to the Sun! Save me from Evil and from Good! That Thy one crown of all the Ten. Even now and here be mine. AMEN."

ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΔ The Mass of the Phœnix in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"Now I begin to pray: Thou Child,
holy Thy name and undefiled!
Thy reign is come: Thy will is done.
Here is the Bread; here is the Blood.
Bring me through midnight to the Sun!
Save me from Evil and from Good!
That Thy one crown of all the Ten.
Even now and here be mine. AMEN.” [via]

In Nomine Babalon, XV

XV

The seed and the root and the leaf and the bud

Will flower and fruit by the grace of Thy blood

That is drawn from the earth in transmutation.

I raise up the cup and adore Babalon!

In Nomine Babalon: 156 Adorations to the Scarlet Goddess

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition.

"In the World’s Tragedy, Household Gods, The Scorpion, and also The God-Eater, the reader may study the efficacy of rape, and the sacrifice of blood, as magical formulae. Blood and virginity have always been the most acceptable offerings to all the gods, but especially the Christian God."

Commentary (ΜΓ) on ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΓ Mulberry Tops in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"In the World’s Tragedy, Household Gods, The Scorpion, and also The God-Eater, the reader may study the efficacy of rape, and the sacrifice of blood, as magical formulae. Blood and virginity have always been the most acceptable offerings to all the gods, but especially the Christian God." [via, see, see, see, see]

"The blood is the life of the individual: offer then blood!"

ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΓ Mulberry Tops in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"The blood is the life of the individual: offer then blood!" [via]

"Black blood upon the altar! and the rustle of angel wings above!"

ΚΕΦΑΛΗ ΜΓ Mulberry Tops in Liber CCCXXXIII, The Book of Lies by Aleister Crowley.

"Black blood upon the altar! and the rustle of angel wings above!" [via]