"Then I perceived the stars to reflect a single sun— Not burning suns themselves, in furious regular race, But mirrors of midnight, lit to remind us of His face. Thus I beheld the truth: ye are stars that give me light; But I read you aright and learn I am walking in the night. Then I turned mine eyes away to the Light that is above you: The answering splendid Dawn arose, and I did not love you. I saw the breaking light, and the clouds fled far away: I was the resurrection of the Golden Star of Day. And now I live in Him; my heart may trace the years In drops of virginal blood and springs of virginal tears."

Synthesis in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"Then I perceived the stars to reflect a single sun—
Not burning suns themselves, in furious regular race,
But mirrors of midnight, lit to remind us of His face.
Thus I beheld the truth: ye are stars that give me light;
But I read you aright and learn I am walking in the night.
Then I turned mine eyes away to the Light that is above you:
The answering splendid Dawn arose, and I did not love you.
I saw the breaking light, and the clouds fled far away:
I was the resurrection of the Golden Star of Day.
And now I live in Him; my heart may trace the years
In drops of virginal blood and springs of virginal tears.” [via]

"It is ill to blaspheme the silence with a wicked whispered thought— How still they were, those nights! when this web of things was wrought! How still, how terrible! O my dolorous tender brides, As I lay and dreamt in the dark by your shameful beautiful sides! And now you are mine no more, I know; but I cannot bear The curse—that another is drunk on the life that stirs your hair: Every hair was alive with a spark of midnight’s delicate flame, Or a glow of the nether fire, or an old illustrious shame."

Synthesis in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"It is ill to blaspheme the silence with a wicked whispered thought—
How still they were, those nights! when this web of things was wrought!
How still, how terrible! O my dolorous tender brides,
As I lay and dreamt in the dark by your shameful beautiful sides!
And now you are mine no more, I know; but I cannot bear
The curse—that another is drunk on the life that stirs your hair:
Every hair was alive with a spark of midnight’s delicate flame,
Or a glow of the nether fire, or an old illustrious shame.” [via]

“‘Out, out, adulteress!’? These be the furies, and the harpies these? That discontent should sum the happiest sky? That of all boons man lacks the greatest—rest!”

The Law of Change in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

“‘Out, out, adulteress!’?
These be the furies, and the harpies these?
That discontent should sum the happiest sky?
That of all boons man lacks the greatest—rest!” [via]

"This passion we possess Necessitous; insistent none the less Because we know not how its purpose brands Our lives. Even on God’s knees and in His hands: The Law of Change."

The Law of Change in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"This passion we possess
Necessitous; insistent none the less
Because we know not how its purpose brands
Our lives. Even on God’s knees and in His hands:
The Law of Change.” [via]

"SOME lives complain of their own happiness. In perfect love no sure abiding stands; In perfect faith are no immortal bands Of God and man."

The Law of Change in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"SOME lives complain of their own happiness.
In perfect love no sure abiding stands;
In perfect faith are no immortal bands
Of God and man.” [via]

"I am plain? ‘Blasphemer! Damned!’? Undoubtedly — I know!"

A Religious Bringing-Up in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"I am plain?
‘Blasphemer! Damned!’? Undoubtedly
— I know!” [via]

"Our parents answer jesting Pilate so. I am the meanest servant of the Christ: But, were I heathen, cannibal, profane, My cruel spirit had not sacrificed My children to this Moloch."

A Religious Bringing-Up in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"Our parents answer jesting Pilate so.
I am the meanest servant of the Christ:
But, were I heathen, cannibal, profane,
My cruel spirit had not sacrificed
My children to this Moloch.” [via]

"I AM! my spirit, and perhaps my mind! But O my heart! I left thy love behind!"

The Two Loves in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"I AM! my spirit, and perhaps my mind!
But O my heart! I left thy love behind!” [via]

"Osiris! Orient godhead! let me still Rest in the dawn of knowledge, ever slaking My lips and throat where yon rose-glimmering hill, The Mountain of the East, its lips is taking To Thy life-lips: I hear Thy keen voice thrill; Arise and shine! the clouds of earth are breaking!"

The Two Loves in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"Osiris! Orient godhead! let me still
Rest in the dawn of knowledge, ever slaking
My lips and throat where yon rose-glimmering hill,
The Mountain of the East, its lips is taking
To Thy life-lips: I hear Thy keen voice thrill;
Arise and shine! the clouds of earth are breaking!” [via]

"What is my will? The sleeper’s sigh at waking."
"WHAT is my soul? The shadow of my will."
"SOPHIE! I loved her, tenderly at worst. Yet in my passion’s highest ecstasy, When life lost pleasure in desire to die And never taste again the deadly thirst For those caresses; even then a curst Sick pang shot through me: looking afar on high, Beyond, I see Σοφία in the sky."

The Two Wisdoms in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"SOPHIE! I loved her, tenderly at worst.
Yet in my passion’s highest ecstasy,
When life lost pleasure in desire to die
And never taste again the deadly thirst
For those caresses; even then a curst
Sick pang shot through me: looking afar on high,
Beyond, I see Σοφία in the sky.” [via]

"Man has two minds: the first beholding all, As from a centre to the endless end: The second reaches from the outer wall, And seeks the centre. This I comprehend. But in the first: ‘I can—but what is worth?’ And in the second: ‘I am dust and earth!’"

The Two Minds in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"Man has two minds: the first beholding all,
As from a centre to the endless end:
The second reaches from the outer wall,
And seeks the centre. This I comprehend.
But in the first: ‘I can—but what is worth?’
And in the second: ‘I am dust and earth!’” [via]

"WELL have I said, ‘O God, Thou art, alone, In many forms and faces manifest! Thou, stronger than the universe, Thy throne! Thou, calm in strength as the sea’s heart at rest!’ But I have also answered: ‘Let the groan Of this Thy world reach up to Thee, and wrest Thy bloody sceptre: let the wild winds own Man’s lordship, and obey at his behest!’"

The Two Minds in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"WELL have I said, ‘O God, Thou art, alone,
In many forms and faces manifest!
Thou, stronger than the universe, Thy throne!
Thou, calm in strength as the sea’s heart at rest!’
But I have also answered: ‘Let the groan
Of this Thy world reach up to Thee, and wrest
Thy bloody sceptre: let the wild winds own
Man’s lordship, and obey at his behest!’” [via]

"O thou, the other Reaper! come to me! Thy dark embraces have a germ of Dawn!"

The Reaper in The Gate of the Sanctuary from The Temple of the Holy Ghost (Collected Works, Vol I) by Aleister Crowley.

"O thou, the other Reaper! come to me!
Thy dark embraces have a germ of Dawn!” [via]